The Homemade Jamz Blues Band - Pay Me No Mind Reviews

 
Pay Me No Mind

"The blues continues to go from strength to strength. A few years ago, one might have wondered if there was a future for three chords and 12 bars, but every month new blues releases are sent to GMR by a variety of blues labels, including the two represented here. Northern Blues is a Canadian company and Telarc is American, but the music they release is blues through and through. These three new releases feature blues artists at extreme ends of the age spectrum. If you add up the ages of all the members of the Homemade Jamz Blues Band you get 37 years! 37 years! If you multiply it by three, you're only 16 years over the age of Pinetop Perkins! That's right, on July 7, 2008, Pinetop turned 95 years old. And Watermelon Slim? Well, he's somewhere in between. But although their ages are all over the map, chronologically speaking, musically, they are all siblings: brothers and sisters in the blues.

"Homemade Jamz Band have been profiled on CBS Sunday Morning News, and National Public Radio, they're touring the major blues festivals this summer, and stars like BB King and Elvin Bishop are quoted on their CD cover praising them. 'These young kids have energy, talent and do the blues proud with their own flavor,' BB said. And as BB's own energy is diminishing, the blues is going to need some fresh blood. The songs on pay me no mind are all originals by Renaud Perry (who adds harmonica to a handful of tracks) but the band -- Ryan Perry on vocals and lead guitar (15 years old), brother Kyle on bass and their 9-year-old sister on drums claim ownership of the tunes well enough! Oh, there's also a cover of John Lee Hooker's
Boom Boom. These kids rock out, sounding far beyond their years. There is vitality in Ryan's vocals, but he manages to convey experience too. And his guitar parts sizzle. You'll be amazed at the time-keeping skills of little sister Taya. Kyle's no slouch, either. With the addition of Miles Wilkinson on rhythm guitar on four tracks, the band's sound is full and loud. This is a great introduction to a group with a future."

- David Kidney
Greenman Review
August, 2008 

 
   

"At the other end of the age spectrum from the 95-year-old Pinetop Perkins is this group that also hails from Mississippi. The Homemade Jamz Blues Band consists of the three Perry siblings: singer-guitarist Ryan, 16; bassist Kyle, 14; and drummer Taya, 9. Their ages and the fact that Ryan and Kyle play homemade guitars made of auto mufflers may seem to peg the band as just a novelty. Forget it: These kids know the blues.

"
Pay Me No Mind bristles with real juke-joint energy and grit, as the Perrys live up to the tradition of Pinetop, Muddy and B.B. All but one of the songs was written by the youngsters' father, Renaud, who also plays harmonica on four tracks. They cover the usual blues territory, but Ryan delivers these tales of hard times and woman trouble with the command of someone who's already been there. Makes you wonder how good he'll be when he really has been."

-N.C.
Philadelphia Enquirer
July, 2008 

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"The Homemade Jamz Blues Band's disc, Pay Me No Mind (NorthernBlues), is a sure bet for best debut album and it comes from the youngest blues band in America. Their combined age is less than 40. Homemade Jamz is comprised of three siblings. Two are in their teen years and one is a pre-teen. Ryan Perry performs lead guitar (on homemade instruments made from car mufflers) and vocals while Kyle Perry handles bass guitar and Taya tackles the drums. The 11 songs - all recorded at their home in Tupelo - ooze with the repetitive boogie blues of Mississippi. A prime example can be heard on Blues Concerto.

"Being a trio, the guitar is naturally the main featured instrument. At this point, Ryan’s guitar solos emulate those of his heroes Albert King, Jimi Hendrix, and Stevie Ray Vaughan. However, to his credit, he resists playing the notes at the pace of a lightning flash. Ryan displays a great potential to blossom into a blues star. He is impressive on
Penny Waiting On Change where the guitar crescendos from a leisurely pace and then explodes into fiery passion. The band’s baby, Taya, delivers skimpy beats and some disorderly cymbal crashes.

"If you can look past them as being a novelty act, you’ll experience some real blues and will hear true natural talent. The instrumental
Shake Rag is assumed to be about dirt-poor, mostly black Shake Rag, Tennessee, which supposedly was a significant influence on a young Elvis Presley. The title track blends a 1950s John Lee Hooker boogie with a trance-like north Mississippi hill drone. Ironically, the least enjoyable track is a cover of Hooker’s Boom Boom.

"The best of the ten original songs is the gritty minor key Mississippi blues
Right Thang Wrong Woman. Here, the sound is so raw you’ll think these kids are being schooled in a smoky juke joint. You wouldn’t think a teen could have experienced the tortured love that is described in the lyrics. Regardless, Ryan sings the song with a deep and serious conviction. Another highlight is Time For Change which lays the foundation for the sound of tomorrow’s blues style.

"There is only so much sound that a trio can make. Wisely, harmonica and rhythm guitar - courtesy of Renaud Perry (the band’s proud father) and Miles Wilkinson - have been added to seven songs. This helps with the fills and makes the sound seem larger. Everything about this developing band will improve as their age and experience both increase. Still, this is one of the better releases made by teenagers. Make no mistake. Homemade Jamz are not snotty-nosed rock ‘n’ roll school kids from the playground. These blues siblings play some of the most real deal blues you’ll hear. They need time to further develop but you’ll be blown away by their credibility. In the meantime, they are giving the experienced artists a run for their money and the world an awareness that blues is still alive in Mississippi.

"NOTE: This CD was also reviewed as the Surprise hit in the June 2008 Blues Bytes."

-Tim Holek
Blues Bytes
July 2008 

 
   

"This has to be the youngest blues band ever! Brothers Ryan (16) & Kyle Perry (13) along with their 9 year old sister Taya are setting the blues world alight. Heavyweights such as BB King and Elvin Bishop have predicted big things for the trio. In fact, they have been invited to play at the opening of the BB King museum in Indianola later this year. This, their debut CD, is already being described as the Holy Grail amongst blues circles. Who Your Friends Are introduces their earthy guitar sound and when your guitars are made from exhausts (mufflers in the USA) then earthy is an understatement. It's a funky, contemporary blues played by a classic power trio set up with guitarist/vocalist Ryan out front. His voice will get better by age, good as it is at the moment. Voodoo Woman is another funk fest. 21st century blues although the sound is a bit thin at times. This is a criticism levelled at most trios but they have youth on their side and that gives them time to fill out their sound. The Worlds Been Good To You is a slow Chicago blues and the addition of harmonica, played by father Renaud (who also writes their songs), is a pleasant surprise. Ryan Perry is another young guitarist destined for greater things. Right Thang, Wrong Woman (I love the title) is a strong song and they have achieved that fuller sound with the addition of Miles Wilkinson on rhythm guitar. The incisive guitar breaks confirm Ryan is the star of the trio. The pace is slowed for Penny Waiting On Change, a straightforward heartfelt blues. Ever had one of those days when you woke up feeling great but by lunchtime it's all gone to pot? This is one of those. There's a flurry of notes in the solo but Kyle on bass is the bedrock on which his brother can do his thang and Taya on drums is more to the front than on most tracks.

"
Blues Concerto is R&B, old style and the harp returns. The production is lost on a few occasions but it does give each of the band a chance to show off their skills individually. Time For Change has some mellow crossover tones and this will get better as it evolves. A re-working in the future will make it one of their biggest tracks. Pay Me No Mind has the harp being used more and this hi-tempo R&B makes full use of it. Jealous keeps the pace up with stinging notes from Ryan's guitar. It's hard to work out their influences but they do this funky blues thing so well. They are a tight unit and the rhythm section backs up the guitarist very well. Shake Rag is a jam and a good one at that with both guitar and harp to the fore. They close with the John Lee Hooker classic, Boom Boom. This is a malevolent song but they don't really have that kind of streak in them just yet. Deeper vocals are required for this and I'm sure that the great man would have enjoyed singing it with these youngsters.

"The album is, quite literally, homemade and I hope that they don't lose too much of that raw sound as they climb the ladder."

-David Blue
NetRhythms.co.uk
July 2008 

 
   

"... From the first chord on the electric guitar, everyone in the kitchen bolted up to pay attention. This was blues music. Real blues music. The kind of stuff that B.B. King and Muddy Waters belt out in juke joints down in the Delta. The kids bopped at the kitchen table, all right. And so did the grandparents in the den. Frankly, I did a few two-steps myself while cooking at the stove.

"I decided I had to meet the three kids who make up the Homemade Jamz Blues Band, so we invited Ryan, Kyle and Taya Perry to visit our studios. I had the pleasure of watching the adults in the room go through the same jaw-dropping experience. Faces twisted. Eyebrows raised. Are these kids really playing this music? It was rich.

"Who knows if these kids will get rich playing their music? I got the sense it's not what drives them. They're not even old enough to vote, and they've already found their talent and their passion. And anybody who listens - well, they're made richer by the experience."

-Michele Norris
NPR
August, 2008 

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(Interviews, video and more tunes available on NPR)
   

"Here is a sure bet for best debut album and it comes from the youngest blues band in America. Their combined age is less than 40. Homemade Jamz is comprised of three siblings. Two are in their teen years and one is a pre-teen. Ryan Perry performs lead guitar (on homemade instruments made from car mufflers) and vocals while Kyle Perry handles bass guitar and Taya tackles the drums. The 11 songs – all recorded at their home in Tupelo – ooze with the repetitive boogie blues of Mississippi. A prime example can be heard on Blues Concerto.

"Being a trio, the guitar is naturally the main featured instrument. At this point, Ryan’s guitar solos emulate those of his heroes Albert King, Jimi Hendrix, and Stevie Ray Vaughan. However, to his credit, he resists playing the notes at the pace of a lightning flash. Ryan displays a great potential to blossom into a blues star. He is impressive on
Penny Waiting On Change where the guitar crescendos from a leisurely pace and then explodes into fiery passion. The band’s baby, Taya, delivers skimpy beats and some disorderly cymbal crashes.

"If you can look past them as being a novelty act, you’ll experience some real blues and will hear true natural talent. The instrumental
Shake Rag is assumed to be about dirt-poor, mostly black Shake Rag, Tennessee, which supposedly was a significant influence on a young Elvis Presley. The title track blends a 1950s John Lee Hooker boogie with a trance-like north Mississippi hill drone. Ironically, the least enjoyable track is a cover of Hooker’s Boom Boom. The best of the ten original songs is the gritty minor key Mississippi blues Right Thang Wrong Woman. Here, the sound is so raw you’ll think these kids are being schooled in a smoky juke joint. You wouldn’t think a teen could have experienced the tortured love that is described in the lyrics. Regardless, Ryan sings the song with a deep and serious conviction. Another highlight is Time For Change which lays the foundation for the sound of tomorrow’s blues style.

"There is only so much sound that a trio can make. Wisely, harmonica and rhythm guitar – courtesy of Renaud Perry (the band’s proud father) and Miles Wilkinson – have been added to seven songs. This helps with the fills and makes the sound seem larger. Everything about this developing band will improve as their age and experience both increase. Still, this is one of the better releases made by teenagers. Make no mistake. Homemade Jamz are not snotty-nosed rock ‘n’ roll school kids from the playground. These blues siblings play some of the most real deal blues you’ll hear. They need time to further develop but you’ll be blown away by their credibility. In the meantime, they are giving the experienced artists a run for their money and the world an awareness that blues is still alive in Mississippi."

-Tim Holek
Blues Art Journal
May-July, 2008 

 
   

"Two of pop music's finest - Steve Winwood and Alex Chilton -- hit the big time while still in their teens; Stevie Wonder even earlier, and Shuggie Otis and Kenny Wayne Shepherd were playing with the big boys before they hit 20. Yes, bands -- people who play their own instruments and possibly write their own material -- made up of folks under 20 are usually, often rightly, considered novelty acts.

"No qualifications are needed for the Perry siblings, together known as the Homemade Jamz Blues Band. From the first notes of this disc -- recorded when drummer Taya was 9, bassist Kyle was 13, and guitarist/vocalist Ryan was 15 -- it's obvious these are musicians ready and worthy to be judged by grown-up standards.

"Taya has the command and confidence of someone who's spent years playing Beale Street gin joints. Can a 9-year-old be this funky, so knowing, on a set of traps? And she and Kyle are a rhythm section with an intuition usually lacking in players three times their ages. And while big brother Ryan's guitar reflects intense study (Jimi Hendrix, Buddy Guy) he's not just regurgitating licks -- impressive as that may be -- he's got the savvy to work what he's heard into something uniquely his own. When he sings, it's not with the voice of a kid or a freakish parody of an adult, but with that of a young man who can sing about a
Voodoo Woman without straining credibility the way this disc, in the most positive way, will."

-R.A.
Vintage Guitar
August, 2008 

 
   

"...it’s an excellent debut. The Jamz have a sound of their own, one that’s true to the spirit of the music and to the energetic spirits of this hot, young band.

"Roger Stolle, proprietor of the Cathead Delta Blues and Folk Art store of Clarksdale, Miss., poses an interesting question in the liner notes: '
Robert Johnson didn’t record until he was 25 years old. Wonder what he sounded like at age 15?' "

-Ben Windham
The Tuscaloosa News
June, 2008 

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"A blues band featuring a 16-year-old lead guitarist/vocalist, a 13-year-old bassist and a 9-year-old drummer might well strike blues fans as little more than a novelty act. Indeed, Ryan Perry (the 16-year-old, his brother Kyle (bass) and sister Taya (drums) have a novel thing going on, but blues lovers will do well to listen to their debut disc before drawing any conclusions. This Tupelo, Miss., trio knocks down 11 solid tunes, 10 of which were penned by the kids' father, Renaud Perry. Right Thang Wrong Woman is a great, original blues number. Ryan sings the hell out of the song, and he snaps off a couple of pretty crunchy guitar solos as well. Blues Concerto showcases Renaud working a fierce harmonica and more strong lead guitar from Ryan. The next generation of blues players sounds like they mean business."

-Philip Van Vleck
Billboard.com
June, 2008 

 
   

"Blues fans who think the genre might be on its last legs would do well to check out the Homemade Jamz Blues Band. The Tupelo, MS group consists of the Perry siblings, singer/guitarist Ryan (16 years old), bassist Kyle (13 years old) and 9-year-old drummer Taya. When their father, Renaud, returned to Germany from military duty in Korea, young Ryan found his dad’s guitar and wanted it. Within a week, he was playing along to commercials on TV. Upon his family’s return to Tupelo, Ryan embraced the blues, soon to be followed by his younger brother and sister.

"An audition at Clarksdale’s Ground Zero Blues Club eventually led to further club and festival dates, appearances in local newspapers, magazines, and on TV. In 2007, as the youngest band ever to compete in the International Blues Challenge in Memphis, they finished second in a field of 157 bands. The band signed with NorthernBlues Music and has released their debut recording,
Pay Me No Mind.

"The disc was recorded in the band’s home in Tupelo, and features compositions written for the group by Renaud Perry (the lone cover is an energetic remake of John Lee Hooker’s
Boom Boom). The songs are well-crafted and mature, considering the voice belongs to a teenager. Some of the highlight tracks include the lively opener, Who Your Real Friends Are, the SRV-like Voodoo Woman, Right Thang, Wrong Woman, Blues Concerto, and the muscular title track.

"Listening to Ryan Perry’s playing, it’s obvious that, like scores of others before him, he’s learned a lot from listening to the masters since there’s a lot of the Kings (Albert & B.B.) in his playing, as well as SRV. However, he’s already capable of expanding on that sound considerably, which is impressive. The young rhythm section is solid, too, with very few missteps. Other than four appearances by dad Renaud on harmonica and producer Miles Wilkinson on rhythm guitar, it’s all on the trio, who play with loads of energy, confidence, and determination

"Stay tuned for big things from the Perrys over the next few years. Sounds like the blues could be in good hands for a long time to come."

-Graham Clarke
Blues Bytes
June, 2008 

 
   

"Every now and then a CD comes along that just blows you away, for one reason or another. Pay Me No Mind, from the Homemade Jamz Blues Band, is one of them, and for lots of reasons. When this CD arrived, I put it on without really looking at the cover – just a cursory glance. Halfway through track one I knew I liked it, and by halfway through track two I knew it was special.

"I didn’t realize just how special until I read the notes and found out that the three main band members are two brothers and a sister – 9, 13 & 15 years old! The 9-year-old is a girl and she’s the drummer! Her 13-year-old brother is the bass player, and her other brother takes lead guitar and vocals. Oh, and their Dad writes the songs and plays harmonica on some of them. They hail from Mississippi, the home of the blues, and it’s very obvious that they listened to the blues from the day that they were born.

"I had listened to the first two tracks thinking that this was a band of 50+ year olds who had been playing together for 20 years or so – and I still thought they were good! Currently, I’ve listened to the CD approximately 20 times and I still can’t believe the age of this band – my feet are tapping and my body is boogeying!

"There’s only one cover version amongst the 11 tracks, and that’s a good version of John Lee Hooker’s
Boom Boom – Dad Renaud Perry wrote the rest, and it’s all good stuff. He plays harp on four of the tracks and fits in so well with his kids. They have a guest, in the shape of rhythm guitarist Miles Wilkinson, on four of the tracks, but apart from that it’s a family affair.

"They’ve been playing at the Ground Zero Blues Club in Clarksdale, Mississippi, and they’ve been on
CBS Sunday Morning. I can’t help but imagine what they will be like in 10 years time (and one of them still won’t have reached 20 years of age!).

"If you don’t buy another blues CD this year, make sure you buy this one."

-Terry Clear
Blues Bytes
June, 2008 

 
   

"There's a new band making waves in the blues business these days, with its first CD released last week. I was busy rattling on about my adventures at the Chicago Blues Festival, and put off writing about this album.

"But I've been playing it a lot, because it's hard to get the always declining BlueNotes mental capacities wrapped around this concept: A great blues band made up of people we would otherwise just call 'kids.'

"The kids are the Homemade Jamz Blues Band and the album is
Pay Me No Mind (NorthernBlues Music). They are siblings Ryan Perry, 16; Kyle Perry, 13; and Taya Perry, 9, out of Tupelo, Miss., and took second place at the 2007 International Blues Challenge.

"Ryan plays lead guitar and sings, Kyle plays bass and Taya drums and sings backup vocals. They get a little help here and there from father Renaud on harp. He also wrote all but one of the songs here. He also built their guitars from old car parts.

"I know, it sounds a little bit like amateur hour, and that's sort of what I thought until put the disc in a player.

"These kids sound good. I probably shouldn't even be calling them kids, since they sound like blues vets. They've been performing for years, and seem to have blues DNA. Their musical sense is well-honed, advanced beyond their years.

"Here's a clip too give you an idea, from the track
The World's Been Good to You.

"What did I tell you? Most of the other tracks sound just as good. It's hard to imagine that those world-weary vocals come from a 16-year-old. And that the feeling that pours out comes from these youngsters. But it does.

"Much credit also goes to Dad Renaud for the songwriting. there may not be any instant classics here, but it's all top-notch. And the recordings were done in their home over just three days.

"One thing in the band bio caught my eye. It says the band began when Renaud and the family stopped in Baumholder, Germany, after returning from Korea, and the boys found a guitar in his luggage. Well, BlueNotes himself, in the day itself, spent a few good hours in Baumholder. I won't try to convince you that BlueNotes was the only thing standing between freedom and tyranny, but the German beer was very good.

"But I digress. The HJBB is a solid young band, full of the blues spirit, and worthy of a listen or several. And they are on the Saturday, July 26 schedule for the Pittsburgh Blues Festival. Check them out for yourself."

-Jim White
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
June, 2008 

 
   

"Ya’ll… the blues are comin’ back. The Homemade Jamz Blues Band, hailing from Tupelo, Mississippi, just released their debut album, Pay Me No Mind. This album will blow your mind.

Where to begin? The band is composed of (you better believe it!) sixteen-year-old Ryan Perry (lead guitar and vocals), thirteen-year-old Kyle Perry (bass), and little sis, nine-year-old Taya Perry (drums). Yeah, nine. And you should hear her play the drums! It is almost impossible to believe that these young kids could play and perform the way that they do—like seasoned professionals! From the first track,
Who Your Real Friends Are, their audience has to know—these kids have talent. Every song is wonderfully feel-good and rhythm-packed. Ryan’s guitar solos are unbelievably melodic; he knows how to make his Ford-muffler guitar sing. Kyle and Taya, on bass and drums, make each track irresistibly moving—it won’t matter if you are in your car or in your living room; you’re gonna dance. When Ryan was asked how he knew how to play the blues he responded with, 'It's just what you feel!' Well, I guess its that simple.

"All the tracks are original with the exception of a fantastic cover of John Lee Hooker’s
Boom Boom, which just makes me smile it’s so good! The title track, Pay Me No Mind, is absolutely addictive. Particulalr highlights include Jealous, a slower and intense piece, and Right Thang, Wrong Woman. That one is self-explanatory.

"The only negative aspect regarding the quality of the album is that Ryan’s voice lacks the full maturity of a truly established blues singer—but come on, the raw talent is undeniable of the sixteen-year-old singer. The maturity and experience that they lack will only come with time, and the electrifying and addictive debut is most certainly a thing that will be a smashing success in the blues world. 5 Stars"

-Bess Johnson
Cashbox Magazine
June, 2008 

 
   

"Most teenagers might be content to laze around during the summer, playing computer games or skateboarding to keep boredom at a minimum. The Perry siblings, however, are not your typical teens--in fact, one of 'em is only nine years old!! Yes, the Homemade Jamz Blues Band, as they call themselves, consists of Ryan, 16, on lead guitar and vocals, brother Kyle, 13, on bass, and sister Taya, 9, on drums!! With a collective age of 38 years, they took the blues world by storm when they finished second in the prestigious IBC in Memphis in 2007, becoming the youngest band to compete in that event. Erstwhile Northern Blues prez Fred Litwin saw their potential and signed them to his label, urging them to record, and the resulting Pay Me No Mind is one of the best and brightest of this year's new releases.

"Their father, Renaud Perry, wrote ten of the cuts, the lone cover serving as the set closer, John Lee's
Boom Boom. Dad also plays a mean harp on four cuts, and producer Miles Wilkinson adds rhythm guitar on four tracks. It's the young folks' show, tho. Ryan picked up his dad's guitar at age seven, soon composing instrumentals and improving seemingly day-by-day. Kyle started on piano, eventually switching to bass. And, young Taya picked up the drumsticks and within months was keeping a rock-steady beat.

"It's really amazing to listen to these young people playing the blues. Ryan's vocals are rich and clear, and his guitar chops certainly belie his youth. One might ask how someone so young can relate to the blues, but these three just seem to connect to the music and the beat, as if it were something they were meant to do.

"The set kicks off with a searing intro from Ryan on a shuffle that reminds us that in tough times like these, 'you find out
Who Your Real Friends Are.' A man in a losing love affair realizes he's 'doing the Right Thang with the Wrong Woman.' The title cut has a 'country blues' feel to it, thanks to dad's harp and Ryan's steady lead work. And, slow blues drives The World's Been Good To You, and the tale of a man who 'woke up feeling like a million dollars,' but now feels like 'a Penny Waitin' On Change.'

"Our favorite cut had a bit of the funk in it, too. Ryan belts out
Voodoo Woman like he's been in love with her for years, while Kyle and Taya keep the backbeat driving this one right down to the Crossroads!

"The Homemade Jamz Blues Band are undoubedly destined for bigger things in the blues world based on this debut. Look for them on festival stages all summer, and check out
Pay Me No Mind for a glimpse into the future of the blues!!!"

-Sheryl and Don Crow
Music City Blues Society, Nashville
June, 2008 

 
   

"...The first thing you need to know about Pay Me No Mind was that the basic tracks were laid down in the living room of the Perry house in just three days. Part two of the home made equation is the fact that their dad made the guitar Ryan plays out of auto parts, (The Ford logo across its body is a bit of give a way), and part three is that ten of the eleven songs on the disc are originals; lyrics by their dad Renaud and music by the kids.

"What I want to know is where did a 16-year-old boy get the voice of a Blues singer at least four times his age? This young man Ryan Perry sings with the authoritative growl of someone whose been playing the Blues circuit for more decades then Ryan has been alive. The thing is, he doesn't just sing well, he sings with a conviction and a passion that I've not heard in players with twice his experience and four times his years. Sure on the slower songs his voice shows its lack of training, but goodness the kids only sixteen. Think what he's going to sound like with a couple more years of professional singing under his belt...

"Musically a trio can be somewhat limited, there's only so much that you can do with bass, drums, and guitar. So it's a pleasant surprise to hear The Homemade Jamz Blues Band mix it up as much as they possibly can. True they're helped out by their dad laying down some really nice harmonica playing on a few tracks and producer Miles Wilkinson adding rhythm guitar on four cuts, but in the end the trio are the ones who created the music everybody is playing. Take the ninth track on the CD,
Jealous for instance. It has a low down, down and dirty, funk like groove, running under Ryan's choppy attack on the guitar that the bass and drums carry with a loose tightness that I haven't heard rhythm sections with twice the experience carry off.

"I've been saying - better than people with more years and experience then these kids have been alive, but the most amazing thing about this disc is how quickly you forget you are listening to a band whose drummer won't legally be allowed in bars for at least ten more years. From Ryan's opening challenge at the start of the disc,
'Ladies and Gentlemen, are you all ready for the blues?' to the last notes of their cover of John Lee Hooker's Boom Boom that ends the disc, this is a rough and ready collection of really well played Blues. Period..."

-Richard Marcus
Blogcritics
June, 2008 

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"Wow! These kids can play. They are collectively 37 years old and are as good as anyone out there three times there age. They got that hungry and lean sound that the old blues used to have. 15-year old Ryan Perry holds down the guitar and vocals like a young Buddy Guy used to up in Chicago. With 13-year old Kyle Perry on bass and sister Taya Perry at nine on drums, these kids have a long future ahead of them.

"This family all hails from the great state of Mississippi and carry the musical heritage of the state around with them. With their dad Renaud Perry helping with harmonica and writing most of the songs, they keep the blues alive and well.

"Check out young Ryan’s howl on the lowdown on the first track
Who Your Real Friends Are and the soul of Time For Change. Ryan also pegs John Lee Hooker with Boom Boom. It is not a two-bit version of this song but straight ahead boogie like John Lee used to do it.

"These kids cover all the versions of the blues. They can put soul and funk and that nasty Chicago sound all into it. This CD has it all right here. Who said you have to be an old man or woman to sing blues? These young kids will show you all you have to have is that feel. They got that raw sound you would hear in a Mississippi Juke Joint or a South Side Chicago club. Kyle & Taya on the rhythm are in the pocket. They never sound too fast or too slow.
Boom Boom is a hard song to play the rhythm to right. These kids have got it down pat. Also, check out that chug-a-lug sound of the song Jealous and you’ll see what I mean.

"You might be a little hesitant for a kid to preach to you about the love and heartache between a man and a woman but young Ryan can preach it just as good as any old man can. Don’t let there age fool you. This is one of the best blues CDs I’ve heard this year. They may have come in second place in Memphis last year at that blues challenge but they proved that they don’t need a trophy to be the best. Definitely get your hands on these jamz cause they are spreading the blues so thick, it’s just like jelly roll.
"

-Jeremiah "Little Junior" James
Baton Rouge Blues Society
June, 2008 

 
   

"The Homemade Jamz Blues Band features Ryan Perry on vocals and lead guitar, brother Kyle on bass and sister Taya on drums – with Renaud Perry featuring on harp (4 tracks) and producer Miles Wilkinson adding rhythm guitar also to 4 tracks.

The band has featured on numerous occasions at the Ground Zero Club in Clarksdale, have been profiled on CBS, finished second in the 2007 International Blues Challenge and are booked to perform at Blues Festivals across the USA in 2008 (including the opening of the BB King Museum in Indianola – so are obviously talented.

In Ryan Perry they have a singer whose vocals are imbued with a natural brooding intensity, whilst also blessed with a guitar style to match – whilst in Kyle and Taya they have a rhythm section that is as tight as it is hot.

They open with
Who Your Real Friends Are which effectively combines traditional and modern blues – fired by the compelling intensity of Ryan’s vocals which are echoed by the aggressive emotiveness of his fretwork. Voodoo Woman rides a mesmerising riff that underpins a slab of broodingly funky blues that recalls Luther Allison and Lonnie Brooks in it’s intensity – Right Thang Wrong Woman is a soulful churner with a strong Freddie King feel that is echoed on Penny Waiting On Change where Ryan’s wah-wah is compelling in it’s intensity rather than trite, as it feels with many guitarists.

Pay Me No Mind is a Waters’ styled shuffle full of machismo replete with churning harp – Blues Concerto pounds along to an infectious Hooker styled boogie rhythm accentuated by Renaud’s harp – whilst Shake Rag is an apt title for a slab of real juke joint blues fired by Sydney Maiden styled harp whilst riding a mesmerising guitar riff.

This band is hot – and you will get a real shock when I tell you that Ryan is aged 15, Kyle is 13 and Taya is just 9 years old. Oh - and by the way – the harmonica player Renaud is their father.
Rating 9"

-Mick Rainsford
Blues in Britain
June, 2008 

 
   

"Hey, move over Hanson. Here’s three sibs, with the youngest 9, that not only play the blues, they play it so that cats like B. B. King find their jaws dropping. With way more attention than a novelty act could ever muster, these kids, one of which plays a guitar made out of a car muffler, have got the blues! in a good way. A high octane experience, this certainly opens the blues to ears of a new generation. The kid’s pop writes the material but they play it with genuine heart and soul. Be sure to give this a spin, you can get a taste on You Tube that’ll convince you to jump in."

-Chris Spector
Midwest Record
June, 2008